RTW: Fairy Tale Re-tellings


Today is Road Trip Wednesday! What is that? It is a blog carnival where the contributors of YA Highway post a weekly topic and participants write their responses. You can jump from blog to blog to see each blogger's take on the question. 

Topic of the week:
In honor of this month's Bookmobile book, Marissa Meyer's CINDER, name a fable or story you'd like to see a retelling of. If you're feeling creative, come up with a premise of your own!

Four years ago I read a lot of books based on fairy tale re-tellings (the best of them Ella Enchanted). There were quite a few based on Cinderella fairy, but I decided I wanted something different. I didn't want to go with the basics, or the ones Disney retold. I already wrote a book in that setting, and it was time for something new and exciting.

Right now I'm revising my Japanese inspired fantasy tale after reading The Bamboo Cutter's Daughter. A childless couple finds a child in the bamboo, and raise her before she must return to the Moon. Many variations of the story exist, including those with many suitors pursuing the Moon Princess, including the Emperor.

In my version, a childless couple is given a child from the moon. On the moongirl's seventeenth birthday, they discover she must return to her home in a year's time. Her adopted sister, Kin, lost her uncle weeks before and can't come to terms with losing her older sister. With the help of her uncle's scrolls, Kin decides to climb Mount Eien to convince the moon for her sister to have a choice about her future. 

It is a book of my heart, and I journeyed to Japan to experience the culture in person. Some of the experiences Kin went through happened on that journey. I'm hoping that I'm able to convey the details in my novel. 

Now, I need to jump back into revision, and hopefully one day it will sit on bookshelves!

Natasha

Comments

  1. I'm looking forward to that book, Natasha (yours, that is)! It's an unusual tale to base a re-telling on, so I'm intrigued to read your version. :)

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    1. Thanks! It is one of the most well-known tale in Japan, but I think it would be nice to introduce it in some way to others.

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  2. That sounds like a really beautiful story! I would definitely read something like that.

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  3. I like your concept, that is something I'd definitely read! I wish you lots of luck with your revising. That sounds like a great twist on the fairy tale trend because it's not a story everyone (in the U.S/Americas) is familiar with.

    Here's my YA Highway Post

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  4. Oh wow! This definitely sounds like something that I'd love to read, and very original too. I really want to see more of the lesser known tales retold in a unique way. We've all seen some of the popular ones retold time and time again. How about some myths and legends from different cultures or a little more obscure tales? :)

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    1. I've fallen in love with Hayao Miyazaki's work and that is one of the reasons why I decided to undertake this story. I wanted something fresh and unique that doesn't come off as something Disney, but more in the style of Studio Ghibli.

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  5. Non western/anglo tales haven't be retold nearly enough. I had a book about Baba Yaga and other non anglo culture tales when I was a kid and there was some great stuff in there.

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  6. Wait until you guys read it. I had to stop at one point because I was overwhelmed by the incredible story telling!

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  7. That sounds like a very interesting story. I hope your revisions go well. there are a lot of Fairy-tale re-tellings based on Cinderella- I think it may be the most popular. Although I love Ella Enchanted, I wish there were more books from lesser known stories.

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    1. I will say that I love that Marissa Meyer decided to go with the Chinese version of Cinderella. The book really helped put fairy tales into a different perspective since they're are something that can span over multiple cultures. Studying them, along with the ones that Grimm and such recorded, is a lot of fun to me. There are quite a few versions I've come across for The Bamboo Cutter's Daughter so deciding what to use and what not to is exciting and challenging.

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  8. Thanks for all the lovely comments! It is wonderful to read while working on the revisions. Loved reading your blog posts, as well.

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  9. Wow! The Bamboo Cutter's Daughter is such a unique idea! I love it! Great post. Gives me great visuals!

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  10. Aww. This sounds really sweet, and I like that you'll be able to explore the complexities of family. Love for siblings is a great motivator, and your MC sounds like a sweet girl. Can't wait to see this finished!

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  11. Wow, that book sounds amazing! I'm not very familiar with Japanese fairy tales but now I really want to read some. It sounds like such a sweet, beautiful story.

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  12. Oh, my, this sounds like a very emotional story. And you went to Japan? Amazing.
    Looking forward to see it out there someday ;)

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