Friday, July 22, 2011

Pearls of Wisdom: Article on Revision with Jo Knowles

I read a lot of articles on writing every week. Actually, every morning I open Twitter and browse over the latest news. I sometimes open up to 10 tabs with the various articles that interest me. I rely a lot on Twitter to provide information about the writing industry than any other social medium. I follow different publications (like @PublishersWeekly), organizations (like @SCBWI), aspiring authors (like @ClaireDawn), upcoming new authors, and current authors (like @cindypon). If you want to see more of who I follow, you can head over to my Twitter page. I would love suggestions on who to follow and feel free to follow me @natashamheck (comment here and I will follow you back).

Check out Pearl by Jo Knowles
One of the articles that stuck out to me this week is the interview of Jo Knowles on Kate Messner's website on the subject of revision. I am in the current stage of editing and revising my WIP so this is something I am very much interested in reading about more than ever. There was on particular pearl of wisdom in there that I just so happened to have written down three times in various places to keep it in mind. After doing the third time, I knew that I had to share this bit with you and encourage you to read the rest of the interview.

"Do you have a favorite revision strategy that helps with any particular part of the process?

Once I have a first draft, I like to use an outline to help me see the progression of the book. There’s a storyboard method I learned from Carolyn Coman that involves thinking of the strongest image and emotion of each chapter to help you see not only the way in which the action unfolds, but how emotion moves through the story as well."


I am at that stage in my WIP where I am trying to find those various threads that I hope to stretch out throughout the story. Sometimes they will be so thin you might not see them, but they remain present. I am not an outliner, but this description brought focus on how I can add cohesion to my WIP as I kick things into gear.


Natasha

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